Three Simple (But Important) Ways to Use Technology in the Classroom

Three Simple (But Important) Ways to use Technology in the Classroom

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Screencastify

Screencastify is a FREE Google Add-On that you can use to make videos for your students or you can have them sign up and put the power in their hands.  I’ve included a Vlog below showing myself using Screencastify and sharing some of my ideas on how to use it. I also highly suggest that you check out Matt Miller’s Ditch that Textbook blog 14 Ways to Create Great Video with Screencastify in the Classroom

 

Scratch

It is my personal belief we should all get our students coding. Not because I think that all students are going to be programmers, but because computational thinking teaches complex problem solving skills and promotes creative thinking. This is coming from a History and Social Sciences teacher, so I if I can embrace coding anyone can. Scratch is a free programming software where students and teachers can code their own videos, games and stories. It introduces students to coding language, problem solving and it is fun. Remember, play is interconnected with improved learning. There are also many extremely helpful videos on YouTube to guide student learning. Similarly, Scratch has a gallery of projects so that your students can see what this program is capable of achieving. My students can do far more than I ever can. Here is a Scratch project that I did – a very quick one – on some basic World War One Review. If I can create this anyone can! Trust me! My scratch project: Historical Trivia


Kahoot

Okay, I am sure that many of you are familiar with Kahoot. However, Kahoot can be used in a lot of different ways that you may not have initially thought of.

For example, Kahoot can be used to check for understanding, to start a class discussion, as an exit ticket for your classroom or as a student presentation tool. Here is a Kahoot that we used called Who do you know?  to check students prior knowledge as well as to discuss the concept of Historical Significance.  We used to it to ask the question: Why do we know some people, but not others? Are the people that we are more readily familiar with more historically significant than others? Why or why not?

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Also published on Medium.

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